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The Innocence of Language

At this stage we probably all feel that we've gotten a pretty decent grasp of the language we speak every day. It's taken time to develop from when we were toddlers, into the school years, teenage years and into adulthood where, if we are to be honest we're still learning. Admitting it may be another story. Like some people still don't know what a tracker mortgage is??

Anyway this is a throwback to those wonderful moments where grammar really doesn't matter and the basic concepts of language will do just fine. I'm sure all children experience the same development possibly at a faster rate but I can only speak for one and we're enjoying tipping through the minefield of the simple English language.

The Lodger is just gone four and is learning to speak. He's finally decided it's time. We are glad he's finally made the decision. The sounds started a long time ago, followed more recently by the one syllable words and now we're deep into the rambling sentences of untranslatable pigeon English. Sometimes directed at you, sometimes at the invisible farmer minding the cows in the corner of the sitting room. Near where Bob the elf lives if you can picture that.

The early days of learning this new language created little gems for us which after a few weeks and more refining he's decided to join the rest of us and drop from his vocabulary. 

We see it as a positive phase to remember these developments so it's more enjoyable seeing how far he's come over time.

It probably started with the doorbell, the "ding" orgininally, then the "ding ding" and now finally the "ding dong". Followed quickly by "open door" We now spend a lot of time opening doors just in case there might be someone there. And knocking at doors so we can open the door again to see if someone us there. There is generally no one there. But we keep trying.

There are two interesting parts to me here. Firstly the simplicity of words and phases that the Lodger has learnt and how he has decided to develop for himself just like the ding ding above.

The second is the sheer annoyance and shock when we say everyday things we probably take for granted that to him just don't make sense. Generally the lodger is right. Because innocence and logic cannot be argued with.

The Lodger now helps to make his meals. Obviously the simple, not near the hot cooker ones. So together we get the pitta and we get the hummus and we explain that we are now going to butter the pitta....which begins the shock. Probably because he doesn't know what butter is. So he insists that we hummus the pitta. So we do and he loves his hummused pita. As I've said all very logical and impossible to argue with.

Current exciting words for no reason whatsoever, as well as the Lodgers repetitive nature and unbelievable memory include Gate (we investigate a large number of gates) choo choo  (cause they are just so much fun) house,  haaawp (shop), walk, no car, no bed and if course the standards in the world of PWS, breakfast, lunch, dinner (and strictly only in that order)
You can also learn from the Lodger. Apparently a pregnant woman keeps her baby in a tummy house. And you can't really argue with that. It's a bit early for Uterus talk I think.

The lodger loves saying hello. He spends ever moment of our walks saying Hello man, Hello lady, Hello Cow, Hello Bus, Hello man, Hello man etc on and on.
But then the logic.
Hello dog. Oh look dada more dog. Hello more dog.
I'm not sure what happens if we see three dogs.


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